Meet the Editors

Publisher and Executive Editor Philip K. Jason is the author or editor of several books. From 1973 to 2001, he taught English and Creative Writing at United States Naval Academy. Allen Mendenhall is associate dean at Faulkner University Thomas Goode Jones School of Law. Donna Meredith is the widely acclaimed author of several books, and a distinguished journalist and reviewer. RIGHT: Photographs by VanessaK Photography, LLC.

Welcome!

The Southern Literary Review celebrates southern authors and their contributions to American literature.  We feature the classic writers who have defined southern literature, and we highlight emerging authors through interviews, profiles, and book reviews. In an effort to back independent bookstores and to encourage creativity in the publishing world, SLR is an IndieBound supporter.  

Allen Mendenhall Interviews Andrew Lawler, Author of “The Secret Token”

AM:  Andrew, thank you very much for doing this interview on the occasion of the paperback release of The Secret Token, which is about the so-called Lost Colony of Roanoke.  I remember learning about Roanoke in the third grade and the amazement I felt when I realized there was this mystery that had never been […]

Allen Mendenhall Interviews John Shelton Reed, Author of “Mixing It Up”

AM:  John, I really appreciate this interview.  Your latest book is Mixing It Up: A South-Watcher’s Miscellany.  I noticed that you dedicated the book to Beverly Jarrett Mills.  She was helpful to me over recent years, and I wish I had known her much earlier and far longer. I sense that she and others, like you, […]

June Read of the Month: “The Final Reckoning,” by Robert Bailey

Reviewed by Claire Hamner Matturro Robert Bailey pumps up the thrill in legal thriller with the fourth and final book in his series about Professor Thomas McMurtrie, or Tom, a law professor who returns to the active practice of law. While none of the four books in his series lacks action, The Final Reckoning is […]

“You and I and Someone Else,” by Anna Schachner

Reviewed by Donna Meredith Perceptive insights and clever word plays highlight Anna Schachner’s debut novel You and I and Someone Else. Set in North Carolina, the story centers on several families coping with loss: a young wife’s loss of her husband, a woman who suffers a late-term miscarriage, a couple who lose a six-year-old son, […]

“Sunset Beach,” by Mary Kay Andrews

Reviewed by Claire Hamner Matturro Bestselling author Mary Kay Andrews (aka Kathy Hogan Trocheck) created her successful second career by writing books with strong, displaced women who reinvent themselves in the face of struggle. Along with her trademark compelling female protagonists, the books written under the Mary Kay Andrews pen name also feature complicated kith […]

Claire Hamner Matturro Interviews Lisa Patton, Author of “Rush”

Rush is a gentle literary novel of the New South involving a diverse group of freshmen co-eds adjusting to college life, facing new challenges, and rushing sororities, each hoping to become members of Alpha Delta Beta. When the sorority sisters and pledges learn that their beloved African-American housekeeper has been denied a promotion due to […]

May Read of the Month: “The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek,” by Kim Michele Richardson

Reviewed by Philip K. Jason  Readers are likely to find Ms. Richardson’s fourth novel to be one of the most original and unusual contributions they will encounter in the realm of the current literature of the American South. Set in the heart of the Great Depression, this engaging story rests on two little-known historical features. […]

“The Lost Country,” by William Gay

Reviewed by Richard Allen The Lost Country is, at its heart, a novel about nothing. It covers a year or so in the life of Billy Edgewater – essentially a nomad – as he hitchhikes his way from town to town in 1950s rural Appalachia, on his way to Tennessee to see his father on […]