Meet the Editors

Publisher and Executive Editor Philip K. Jason is the author or editor of several books. From 1973 to 2001, he taught English and Creative Writing at United States Naval Academy. Allen Mendenhall is a writer, attorney, and educator. He has taught in a university, a law school, a penitentiary, and a Japanese private school. RIGHT: Photographs by VanessaK Photography, LLC.

Welcome!

The Southern Literary Review celebrates southern authors and their contributions to American literature.  We feature the classic writers who have defined southern literature, and we highlight emerging authors through interviews, profiles, and book reviews. In an effort to back independent bookstores and to encourage creativity in the publishing world, SLR is an IndieBound supporter.  

“Valentine’s Day,” by April Kelly

Reviewed by Donna Meredith If you enjoy a mystery with a strong injection of humor, you should pick up a copy of Valentine’s Day by April Kelly. With a tone that evokes the best writing of Janet Evanovich, Kelly gifts mystery fans with newly minted private investigator Rick Valentine, a slightly more competent and sexually […]

“Miss Dreamsville and the Lost Heiress of Collier County,” by Amy Hill Hearth

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl There are ladies with stories to tell, maiden ladies, of course, but also ladies with worldly experience, oral histories for sure, and in the south the stories are most fun when they rub against one another, meandering down and along rivulets until collecting in a main stream. I recall, for […]

“The Professor,” by Robert Bailey

Reviewed by Claire Hamner Matturro Move over, John Grisham, there’s a new kid on the legal thriller playing field. Robert Bailey, an Alabama trial attorney and graduate of The University of Alabama School of Law, returns the kickoff for a 100 yard touchdown with his debut novel, The Professor. The football reference is apropos as […]

January Read of the Month: “Casey’s Last Chance,” by Joseph B. Atkins

Reviewed by Philip K. Jason “Last chance for what?” the eager reader might ask. To make it to the majors? To score big at anything? In this debut novel, it’s this sorry fellow’s last chance to get out from under the debts incurred over a decade or two of minor league hustling and losing. Not […]

“Secondhand Sister,” by Rhett DeVane

Reviewed by Donna Meredith In Rhett’s DeVane’s latest novel, Secondhand Sister, Mary-Esther Sloat may be down on her luck, but that’s about to change when she flees hurricane-ravaged New Orleans for a new life and sanctuary in North Florida. The hospitality of newfound friends and family soon envelops her—and this sixth novel in the beloved […]

“Jacob Jump,” by Eric Morris

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl Pat Conroy prefaces Eric Morris’s first novel by placing him in a pantheon of southern writers whose theme is darkness: Cormac McCarthy, Ron Rush, and Flannery O’Connor. One could be “tripped up” by arguing such. It’s equally likely that Morris’s first novel could be placed in a larger context: any […]

Allen Mendenhall Interviews Glenn Arbery, Author of “Bearings and Distances”

AM: First of all, congratulations on the publication of your novel, Bearings and Distances. You’ve got deep roots in the South but haven’t lived here in some time. Do you ever feel a sense of, pardon the term, alienation? GA: Thank you. As for a sense of alienation, sure I’ve felt it, but less in […]

“A Clear View of the Southern Sky: Stories,” by Mary Hood

Reviewed by Dan Sundahl I once had a student who wrote a poem about a farmer coming home mid-afternoon. In the farm-house kitchen, refreshed by some icey-sweet tea, he listened to muffled voices in an upstairs room. Carefully and quietly he mounted the steps and then down the darkened hallway to a room with a […]