Meet the Editors

Publisher and Executive Editor Philip K. Jason is the author or editor of several books. From 1973 to 2001, he taught English and Creative Writing at United States Naval Academy. Allen Mendenhall is a writer, attorney, and educator. He has taught in a university, a law school, a penitentiary, and a Japanese private school. RIGHT: Photographs by VanessaK Photography, LLC.

Welcome!

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The Southern Literary Review celebrates southern authors and their contributions to American literature.  We feature the classic writers who have defined southern literature, and we highlight emerging authors through interviews, profiles, and book reviews. In an effort to back independent bookstores and to encourage creativity in the publishing world, SLR is an IndieBound supporter.  

March Read of the Month: “A Cuban in Mayberry,” by Gustavo Pérez Firmat

Gustavo Perez Firmat

Reviewed by Miles Smith IV When Gustavo Pérez Firmat told a fellow Cubano he planned to write a work on The Andy Griffith Show, his friend lamented that this was an americanada project, meaning that it was typically Anglo-American and beneath a cultured Cubano scholar. Firmat’s project became more than a simple exploration of mid-twentieth […]

Allen Mendenhall Interviews David Joy, Author of Where All Light Tends to Go

David Joy

AM: We’re thrilled to interview you at Southern Literary Review, David. Thank you. Your novel is Where All Light Tends to Go, a story about the underbelly of North Carolina, where outlawing is, the opening lines tell us, “as much a matter of blood as hair color and height.” Tell us how Jacob McNeely, your […]

“Facing a Lonely West,” by Helen Losse

Helen Losse

Reviewed by William Aarnes Two poems in Helen Losse’s new collection, Facing a Lonely West, stick in the mind. The playful “Poetry as Sloe Gin” offers a number of metaphors for poetry, suggesting that “Coleslaw generates some poetry upon occasion” and that “Poetry is the whole / of a schoolboy, not a select part.” The […]

“The Ice Garden,” by Moira Crone

Moira Crone

Reviewed by Lynn Braxton Moira Crone’s novel, The Ice Garden, set in the town of Fayton, North Carolina, in the early 1960’s, contradicts the prevailing belief that all children are naturally born into a world of blue skies and butterflies where everything is soft and warm. Ten year old Claire McKenzie, the narrator of this […]

Allen Mendenhall Interviews Mark Schimmoeller, Author of “Slowspoke”

Mark Schimmoeller

AM: Mark, I’m excited about this interview because I’d like to say I know someone who made a cross-country trip on a unicycle. Not many people can claim that—probably just the people who know you. Why in the world did you undertake this journey? MS: I’m thrilled that you know a cross-country unicycle traveler—and a […]

February Read of the Month: “In The Night Orchard: New and Selected Poems,” by R. T. Smith

R. T. Smith

Reviewed by Brendan Galvin If a reader’s first demand for poetry is that it consist of language other than journalese, then this new and selected volume made up of seventy-three poems taken from eleven previous collections should provide a substantial view of R. T. Smith’s achievement. In Smith’s work there are none of the usual […]

SLR Welcomes New Contributor Brendan Galvin

Brendan Galvin

Brendan Galvin is the author of sixteen collections of poems. Habitat: New and Selected Poems 1965-2005 (LSU Press) was a finalist for the National Book Award. His Cape Cod crime novel, Wash-a-shores, is available on Amazon Kindle. The Air’s Accomplices, a collection of new poems, is forthcoming from LSU Press in the spring of 2015. He lives […]

“Southern Women and Their Birds,” Essay by John Nelson

Essay by John Nelson I came to literature long before I came to birds. I remember cardinals and robins from my childhood in suburban Chicago, and I probably saw kingfishers and herons as a friend and I searched for snakes along the Des Plaines River, but I don’t recall meeting anyone whose imagination had been […]