Meet the Editors

Publisher and Executive Editor Philip K. Jason is the author or editor of several books. From 1973 to 2001, he taught English and Creative Writing at United States Naval Academy. Allen Mendenhall is a writer, attorney, and educator. He has taught in a university, a law school, a penitentiary, and a Japanese private school. RIGHT: Photographs by VanessaK Photography, LLC.

Welcome!

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The Southern Literary Review celebrates southern authors and their contributions to American literature.  We feature the classic writers who have defined southern literature, and we highlight emerging authors through interviews, profiles, and book reviews. In an effort to back independent bookstores and to encourage creativity in the publishing world, SLR is an IndieBound supporter.  

Allen Mendenhall Interviews Howard G. Franklin, Author of “Gideon’s Children”

Howard G. Franklin

APM: It’s a privilege to do this interview on the occasion of the publication of your novel, Gideon’s Children. This book is quite a bit different from your previous book, An Irish Experience. You’ve gone from travelogue to novel. What prompted the change? HGF: Thank you, Allen, for the opportunity to connect with readers of […]

May Read of the Month: “Study of Scarletts,” by Margaret Donovan Bauer

Margaret Donovan Bauer

Reviewed by Donna Meredith Think you know everything there is to know about Scarlett O’Hara? Not so fast! Margaret Donovan Bauer’s newest book will likely have you reexamining the true nature of this American icon. Bauer’s intelligent analysis of five novels with strong female characters in A Study of Scarletts: Scarlett O’Hara and Her Literary […]

“Retarded Girl Raised in Dog Pen,” by Lauren Leigh

Reviewed by Amy Susan Wilson Disabilities, a family murder, Mississippi, a mental institution, and the spirit of redemption all appear in Lauren Leigh’s debut novel, Retarded Girl Raised in Dog Pen. Every chapter, while often bearing brutal abuse in the household of a rural Mississippi family, rings like a bell, clear and resonant with no […]

Allen Mendenhall Interviews Stephen Roth, Author of “A Plot for Pridemore”

Stephen Roth

AM: Pridemore, Missouri—the setting for your novel, A Plot for Pridemore. Why this place in particular? SR: Missouri has been my home for the past 26 years, so it made sense to write about a part of the country that was very familiar to me. I also felt that basing Pridemore in Missouri would allow […]

“The Christ of New Orleans”: Everette Maddox, A Reminiscence

Polaroid, circa 1977—Ralph Adamo, left; Michael Presti, middle, Everette Maddox, right—at my house in New Orleans on North Miro Street

Essay by Louis Gallo What if I just caved in, gave out, pulled over to the side of the road of life, & expired like an old driver’s license? You might say He didn’t get far in 31 years. But I’d say That’s all right, it was the world’s longest trip on an empty tank. […]

SLR Welcomes New Contributor Louis Gallo

Louis Gallo

Lou Gallo’s work has appeared or is forthcoming in Fiction Fix, Glimmer Train, Hollins Critic, Rattle, Southern Quarterly, Litro, New Orleans Review, Xavier Review, Glass: A Journal of Poetry, Missouri Review, Mississippi Review, Texas Review, Baltimore Review, Pennsylvania Literary Journal, The Ledge, storySouth, Houston Literary Review, Tampa Review, Raving Dove, The Journal (Ohio), Greensboro Review, and […]

“Liar’s Bench,” by Kim Michele Richardson

Kim Michele Richardson

Reviewed by Philip K. Jason This glorious debut novel is one of an unexpectedly fine crop of recent and new Southern fiction. It confronts the tragic persistence of racism and the resilient, transcendent power of the human spirit. It is at once a story of young love, of traditions both poisonous and healing, and of […]

April Read of the Month: “Sewing Holes,” by Darlyn Finch Kuhn

Darlyn Finch Kuhn

Reviewed by Donna Meredith Like many Southern novels, Sewing Holes explores a somewhat dysfunctional family facing challenges and loss. Yet Darlyn Finch Kuhn’s refreshing approach to this material results in a novel more heartwarming than tragic, more uplifting than gloomy. Narrator Tupelo Honey Lee is known by her middle name—for obvious reasons. Set in 1975 […]