Meet the Editors

Publisher and Executive Editor Philip K. Jason is the author or editor of several books. From 1973 to 2001, he taught English and Creative Writing at United States Naval Academy. Allen Mendenhall is a writer, attorney, and educator. He has taught in a university, a law school, a penitentiary, and a Japanese private school. RIGHT: Photographs by VanessaK Photography, LLC.


The Southern Literary Review celebrates southern authors and their contributions to American literature.  We feature the classic writers who have defined southern literature, and we highlight emerging authors through interviews, profiles, and book reviews. In an effort to back independent bookstores and to encourage creativity in the publishing world, SLR is an IndieBound supporter.  

Allen Mendenhall Interviews Russell Scott, Author of The Hard Times

AM: Thank you for the interview and congratulations on the publication of The Hard Times. This novel opens in Mississippi with an alarming scene involving a doctor—or doctors—and then brings us to Africa. You’re a doctor in Mississippi who’s traveled to Africa. What’s going on here? RS: I guess you write what you know; it […]

On Harper Lee’s “Go Set a Watchman”: An Essay

Essay by Glynn Custred There are several ways a novel can become a bestseller. At one end of the scale are the author’s name recognition and heavy investment in an aggressive marketing campaign. At the other end is the widespread appeal of what the story has to say and how well it is said, expressing […]

SLR Welcomes New Contributor Glynn Custred

Glynn Custred is professor emeritus of anthropology at California State University East Bay (formerly Hayward) and a member of the American Anthropological Association.

“Soon,” by Pam Durban

Reviewed by Dan Sundahl Came a time I drove into old man Engebretson’s farm yard, late 1950s, southern Minnesota. It was a good bright day with a light sugary coating of snow on the ground. The old man had a 40-acre duck pond on his farm and corn rows to walk, ducks and pheasants in […]

“Migratory Animals,” by Mary Helen Specht

Reviewed by Elizabeth Harris Migratory Animals is an ambitious, contemporary-feeling novel that measures, for me, the difference between Now in Southern writing and a classic Then—even as issues from Then still devil our shared lives. It’s a Then of William Faulkner, Katherine Anne Porter, Ralph Ellison, William Goyen, and those of their early-to-mid-twentieth-century characters who […]

SLR Welcomes New Contributor Elizabeth Harris

Elizabeth Harris is the author of Mayhem: Three Lives of a Woman, which won the 2014 Gival Press Novel Award. Her short story collection won the John Simmons Award from the University of Iowa Press. Harris taught at the University of Texas at Austin and is married to Faulkner scholar Warwick Wadlington. Visit Elizabeth Harris […]

Donna Meredith Interviews Glenn Taylor, Author of “A Hanging at Cinder Bottom”

DM: In the Acknowledgements you mention a Jackson Herald article covered the last public execution in the state. How was that article helpful in writing the first chapter? What details of that hanging are incorporated into your fiction? GT: I would say that article was immeasurably helpful, in that I had started the book and […]

November Read of the Month: “A Hanging at Cinder Bottom,” by Glenn Taylor

Reviewed by Donna Meredith Glenn Taylor’s new over-the-top caper sparkles with cinematic scenes begging to be transformed into film. A Hanging at Cinder Bottom: A Novel (Tin House Books) is primarily set in West Virginia coal country with occasional forays into Baltimore. The white-faced monkey depicted on the cover plays a role in a story […]