“Assassination at Bayou Sauvage,” by DJ Donaldson

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl DJ Donaldson is the author of a series of Andy Broussard / Kit Franklyn mysteries, most of which have been digitally published in the last half-decade or so. Donaldson’s mystery is readable, but if placed side-by-side with James Lee Burke’s Dave Robicheaux novels, there are notable differences. Burke, for example, […]

September Read of the Month: “Book of the Beloved,” by Carolyn Haines

Reviewed by Claire Hamner Matturro The amazing Carolyn Haines is at it again. The compelling, complex and darkly fascinating Book of the Beloved illustrates all over again just how talented and versatile the award-winning Haines is as a writer. Beloved is a book you won’t be able to put down, Southern to the core, and […]

“Bill Corrington, From Poetry to ‘Killer Bees’: A Personal Interview,” by Louis Gallo

A personal interview transcribed from long out-of-print and defunct The Courier—the Weekly Newspaper of New Orleans (Nov 27-Dec3, 1975) in hopes of greater dissemination circa 2016. —Louis Gallo This piece is reproduced directly from the crumbling newsprint pages of the original Courier edition.  It describes a very much alive Bill Corrington in 1975.  Some current […]

April Read of the Month: “The Feathered Bone,” by Julie Cantrell

Reviewed by Adele Annesi The Feathered Bone, by New York Times bestselling author Julie Cantrell, fuses poetic voice and unwavering honesty in a haunting tale of worst fears come true, best intentions gone horribly wrong, and a freedom that brings hope beyond this life. Set in New Orleans and rural Louisiana in the years involving […]

Laughlin: Romanticist Extraordinaire, A Memoir

By Louis Gallo Laughlin, Ghosts Along the Mississippi: An essay in the poetic interpretation of Louisiana’s plantation archictecture—One hundred photographs by the author (Bonanza Books, NY—1961) —Clarence John Laughlin, Aperture Monograph (1973) I. I’ve never believed that literature is an ideal conduit for surrealism other than in spurts such as the “Nighttown” episode in Joyce’s […]

“The Christ of New Orleans”: Everette Maddox, A Reminiscence

Essay by Louis Gallo What if I just caved in, gave out, pulled over to the side of the road of life, & expired like an old driver’s license? You might say He didn’t get far in 31 years. But I’d say That’s all right, it was the world’s longest trip on an empty tank. […]

“My Sunshine Away,” by M.O. Walsh

Reviewed by Michael Pitts In his debut novel, M.O. Walsh offers an exceptional mixture of adolescent exploration, intrigue, and violence. Weaving between the years of childhood, high school, and adulthood, the text is an exemplary addition to the Bildungsroman tradition with its central focus being the development of a young boy. This narrator must endure […]

“The Cottoncrest Curse,” by Michael H. Rubin

Reviewed by Donna Meredith It’s the history woven into the tale that grabbed me most in Michael H. Rubin’s debut novel, The Cottoncrest Curse. Thoroughly researched, this historical thriller captures the high drama of the Civil Rights Era’s Freedom Riders and Knights of the White Camellia and offers authentic details concerning the harvesting of sugarcane […]