The Tate of Our Souls: The Lost Cause of the Southern Agrarians

  Essay by James McWilliams Few readers, even the well-read, know much about Allen Tate. Those who do know the arcane American poet—usually professors who teach “southern literature”—would likely not label him a humanitarian. Cerebral, distant, combative, self-obsessed—yes—but not a social reformer in any sense of the term. And yet (a million caveats notwithstanding) there […]

“From Self-Reliance to Loss of Sovereign Self: The Ghost of Emerson in Walker Percy’s Fictional Poetics”

Essay by Louis Gallo  We rarely associate the names of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Walker Percy, yet both deal with common philosophic and social concerns which make it clear that Percy, like so many writers following Emerson, can be examined from the perspective of Transcendentalism in general and self-reliance in particular.  However remote Percy’s sensibility may […]

“The Christ of New Orleans”: Everette Maddox, A Reminiscence

Essay by Louis Gallo What if I just caved in, gave out, pulled over to the side of the road of life, & expired like an old driver’s license? You might say He didn’t get far in 31 years. But I’d say That’s all right, it was the world’s longest trip on an empty tank. […]

Loyola Commemorates 30th Anniversary of A Confederacy of Dunces

The 30th anniversary of John Kennedy Toole’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, A Confederacy of Dunces, will be celebrated at Loyola University New Orleans during Wolfpack Welcome Aug. 23-27, the week of orientation for new students. Loyola’s ties to the novel go back to the days when it was an unpublished work. While teaching in the English […]