“A Sensory History of the Civil War,” by Mark M. Smith

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl There’s an online collection now providing access to over 7,000 different photographic views and portraits made during the American Civil War.  The images represent the original glass plate negatives photographed under the supervision of Mathew Brady and Alexander Gardner. The images are powerful: the dead about to be interred at […]

“The Poisoned Table,” by Diane Michael Cantor

Reviewed by Donna Meredith “I was a slave,” a renowned white actress confesses in Diane Michael Cantor’s captivating historical novel, The Poisoned Table (Mercer University Press, 2015). Private lives are far from what others imagine them to be in this story based on the life of nineteenth-century British actress and writer Fanny Kemble. Events take […]

At Appomattox

Essay by Casey Clabough “You’re in the wrong park,” I told the young men. They shifted uneasily. One backed away toward the truck. “We’re just waiting on Jimmy,” the tallest one said. “You’re not re-enactors?” “No sir.” * I spent most of my youth on a farm in rural Appomattox County. I live on another […]

Southern LitFest 2015

Bourbon, Literature and Southern Charm: Southern LitFest 2015 June 5 & 6, Newnan, Georgia Good food, great literature, bourbon on an inviting porch, Market Day on the square, fiddlers picking a bluegrass tune …people having a great time talking about books, films and Southern culture in a classic small town setting. Highlights include: On Friday evening: […]

Allen Mendenhall Interviews Robert J. Ernst, author of “The Inside War”

APM: Thanks for taking the time to sit down for this interview, Bob. Your novel The Inside War is about an Appalachian mountain family during the Civil War. How long have you been interested in the Civil War? RJE: I have had an interest in the Civil War for many years. Specifically, the effect of […]

“Here and Again,” by Nicole R. Dickson

Reviewed by Jessi Lewis Here and Again is the story of the widow Virginia (Ginger) Martin, the repercussions of her husband’s death in the Iraq War, and how her loss is a repetition of grief from other generations. Through Ginger’s familial struggles with her three children, the reader is introduced to the parallels of loss. […]

“Remembering Medgar Evers,” by Minrose Gwin

Reviewed by Chris Timmons Medgar Evers should be of interest to anyone who has examined the racial history of the United States, and of the South. It’s too bad he is now near-forgotten. Undoubtedly, general American forgetfulness has much to do with it; as far as history goes, Americans do not have much memory. Nor […]

“The Day is a White Tablet,” by Jill Fletcher Pelaez

Reviewed by Donna Meredith Jill Fletcher Pelaez creates a compelling fictional world steeped in lesser-known details of the last days of the Civil War in her novel The Day is a White Tablet. The story is told through the eyes of fourteen-year-old Tench Traymore, a black youth charged with the task of caring for his […]