“The Timekeeper’s Son,” by Sara Baker

Reviewed by Molly Hurley Moran Set in the fictional Southern town of Milledge, Georgia, Sara Baker’s luminous novel The Timekeeper’s Son moves beyond the issues and conflicts usually associated with such settings to embrace more universal themes concerning human connection, forgiveness, and grace.  The plot revolves around two families who are unknown to each other […]

“South of the Etowah,” by Raymond L. Atkins

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl The “Etowah” in the title to Raymond L. Atkins’s recently published book refers to a 164-mile-long waterway rising in northwest Georgia to begin flowing south and then west through Rome, Georgia. If one had the interest, one might build a raft and, Huckleberry-like, float along through Alabama down to Mobile […]

“Reckoning and Ruin,” by Tina Whittle

Reviewed by Philip K. Jason I have finally caught up with Tina Whittle’s Tai Randolph Mystery series, now in its fifth installment. Set in Atlanta and Savannah, this tale of crime, family, retribution, and Old South/New South contrasts and continuities has plenty of energy and strong characters. It’s main center of interest, however, is not […]

Janice Daugharty

Janice Daugharty is Artist-in-Residence at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, in Tifton, Georgia. She is the author of one story collection and five novels: Dark of the Moon, Necessary Lies, Pawpaw Patch, Earl in the Yellow Shirt, and Whistle.

Katie DePoppe

Katie DePoppe is an award-winning freelance writer, developmental editor, and former book publicist. She was born and raised in Charleston, South Carolina. In 2009, she became the founding editor at large for Azalea Media, a media company that produces three regional lifestyle and cultural publications throughout South Carolina and Georgia. This endeavor led to the […]

Allen Mendenhall Interviews Glenn Arbery, Author of “Bearings and Distances”

AM: First of all, congratulations on the publication of your novel, Bearings and Distances. You’ve got deep roots in the South but haven’t lived here in some time. Do you ever feel a sense of, pardon the term, alienation? GA: Thank you. As for a sense of alienation, sure I’ve felt it, but less in […]

“A Clear View of the Southern Sky: Stories,” by Mary Hood

Reviewed by Dan Sundahl I once had a student who wrote a poem about a farmer coming home mid-afternoon. In the farm-house kitchen, refreshed by some icey-sweet tea, he listened to muffled voices in an upstairs room. Carefully and quietly he mounted the steps and then down the darkened hallway to a room with a […]

September Read of the Month: “The Wiregrass,” by Pam Webber

Reviewed by Phil Jason It’s 1969 and helicopters drum above the town of Crystal Springs, Alabama twice a day. At ten each morning they leave Fort Rucker for a training field: Field 10. Twelve hours later, the choppers leave in formation to make the return trip. The scheduled explosions of light and noise define the […]