“It Comes in Waves,” by Erika Marks

Reviewed by Jenny Huston Crowley Many readers think of a “beach read” as having a shallow storyline and underdeveloped characters. It Comes in Waves, Erika Marks’s fourth novel, fits the beach material category, except that Marks has written an engaging story with skill and insight. According to the author, “There’s no question that for me, […]

Jenny Huston Crowley

Jenny Huston Crowley, retired nurse and medical practice administrator, lives in Tallahassee, Florida. A graduate of Emory University with degrees in English and Nursing, she is currently writing her memoir. Her award winning creative nonfiction stories have appeared in the Seven Hills Review and Life Lessons: Writings from the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at FSU. […]

April Read of the Month: “Wet Work,” by Donna Meredith

Reviewed by Claire Hamner Matturro “This isn’t what Isaac Harewood hoped to buy with his money.” Not at all. Rather, in Wet Work, the latest novel by Tallahassee’s award-wining author Donna Meredith, Harewood expects to purchase a falsehood and restore his wealth at the expense of the well-being of the unsuspecting public. By donating millions […]

Claire Hamner Matturro

Claire Hamner Matturro, a former lawyer and college teacher, is the author of four legal mysteries with a sense of humor. Her books are Skinny-Dipping (2004) (a BookSense pick, Romantic Times’ Best First Mystery, and nominated for a Barry Award); Wildcat Wine (2005) (nominated for a Georgia Writer of the Year Award); Bone Valley (2006) and Sweetheart Deal (2007) (winner of Romantic Times’ Toby Bromberg […]

“Down and Out in Bugtussle, The Mad Fat Road to Happiness,” by Stephanie McAfee

Reviewed by Amy Susan Wilson Down and Out in Bugtussle, The Mad Fat Road to Happiness, by Stephanie McAfee, is hilarious. It is not merely a “chick-lit” exploration of female issues—it resonates not only because of its superbly crafted world of women who create a sense of community for themselves, but also because it explores […]

Matt Simmons Interviews Drew Perry, Author of Kids These Days

MS:  Do you think this book had to take place in Florida? Is there a particular understanding of Florida in America, 2014, that makes it useful for what you’re doing here? Is Florida still a place of leisure and escape, like it was throughout the 20th century, or has it become something wild and untamed […]

March Read of the Month: “Kids These Days,” by Drew Perry

Reviewed by Matt Simmons Perhaps no trope is as evocative of southern writing as the “sense of place,” a concept that can be both incredibly limiting and powerfully productive in how we read about and respond to the American South. On the one hand, this trope may force us to read in search of southern […]

“Reparation,” by Ruth Rodgers

Reviewed by Donna Meredith Ruth Rodgers’s debut novel, Reparations, tells the poignant story of a friendship in the 1940s between two girls—one black, one white. Yes, it’s another story with race relations at its center, a story the South must tell and retell because each iteration takes us one step further toward understanding and healing […]