“Sunset Beach,” by Mary Kay Andrews

Reviewed by Claire Hamner Matturro Bestselling author Mary Kay Andrews (aka Kathy Hogan Trocheck) created her successful second career by writing books with strong, displaced women who reinvent themselves in the face of struggle. Along with her trademark compelling female protagonists, the books written under the Mary Kay Andrews pen name also feature complicated kith […]

May Read of the Month: “The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek,” by Kim Michele Richardson

Reviewed by Philip K. Jason  Readers are likely to find Ms. Richardson’s fourth novel to be one of the most original and unusual contributions they will encounter in the realm of the current literature of the American South. Set in the heart of the Great Depression, this engaging story rests on two little-known historical features. […]

“The Lost Country,” by William Gay

Reviewed by Richard Allen The Lost Country is, at its heart, a novel about nothing. It covers a year or so in the life of Billy Edgewater – essentially a nomad – as he hitchhikes his way from town to town in 1950s rural Appalachia, on his way to Tennessee to see his father on […]

“Troubles Wedding Caper,” by Jen Talty and “The Truffle with Weddings,” by Laura Durham

Reviewed by Claire Hamner Matturro  Isn’t there something about a cozy mystery and a wedding that makes for a natural nexus between the two? A cozy mystery—a subgenre of crime fiction—is charming, but not without its drama, tension, and suspense, which, it so happens, are also elements of a typical wedding. Thus, within the ever-popular […]

“Confessions of a Christian Mystic,” by River Jordan

Reviewed by Niles Reddick River Jordan’s Confessions of a Christian Mystic is an inspirational work of nonfiction and unveils parts of her journey, illustrates her deep and abiding faith in God, and most importantly offers readers both a road map and encouragement to keep looking in every nook and cranny to find God, build a […]

April Read of the Month: “Road’s End,” by Rebecca Barrett

Reviewed by Claire Hamner Matturro Lush, lyrical, often painfully sad, the ultimately uplifting Road’s End (Witch Creek Publishing 2017), by Rebecca Campbell Barrett, is Southern literature at its finest. The story of three generations of a West Alabama family focuses on headstrong, sometimes impetuous women whose menfolk are not overlooked. Inspired in part by Barrett’s […]

“Southern Writers Bear Witness,” edited by Jan Nordby Gretlund

Reviewed by William Walsh There’s something about the tactile sensation of opening a book and smelling the paper and ink that lends itself to seemingly unlimited possibilities. Two very distinct things prompted my anticipation of Southern Writers Bear Witness. One, I started off in the mid-1980s interviewing southern writers, including some of the same writers […]

“Two Minus One,” by Kathryn Taylor

Reviewed by Jessica Williams In Two Minus One, Kathryn Taylor bravely shares her personal story of pain, betrayal, and loneliness following a divorce that she didn’t foresee. Her divorce followed several years of a fairytale marriage highlighted by extravagant adventures and trips and numerous acts of kindness. However, the union ended abruptly in an onslaught […]