Meet the Editors

Publisher and Executive Editor Philip K. Jason is the author or editor of several books. From 1973 to 2001, he taught English and Creative Writing at United States Naval Academy. Allen Mendenhall is a writer, attorney, and educator. He has taught in a university, a law school, a penitentiary, and a Japanese private school. RIGHT: Photographs by VanessaK Photography, LLC.

August Read of the Month: “Hopscotch,” by Steve Cushman

Reviewed by Claire Matturro Someone draws a hopscotch board on a sidewalk by a hospital in Greensboro, North Carolina. The hospital CEO with a Grinch persona orders it cleared off and a recently released felon, John Deaver, glad for his job as a janitor, erases it. But the chalk hopscotch board reappears on the sidewalk—again […]

“Following Truman Capote on the Island of Ischia, Italy,” by Susan Van Allen

Essay by Susan Van Allen  I’m standing on a balcony overlooking the port of Forio, on the island of Ischia, floating in the Mediterranean, off the coast of Naples. Sounds fancy, but it’s far from it. The port is fronted by a parking lot of taxis and Vespas, smooching teenagers, signoras strolling by with bags of […]

Susan Van Allen

Susan Van Allen is the author of three books about Italian travel, including 100 Places in Italy Every Woman Should Go, and has written for many publications, including National Geographic Traveler and AFAR. She also designs and hosts “Golden Weeks in Italy: For Women Only trips.” Visit her website at www.susanvanallen.com for more information.

“The Southern Philosopher: Collected Essays of John William Corrington,” Edited by Allen Mendenhall

Reviewed by Jay Langdale  Poet, attorney and film-writer John William Corrington was an enigmatic artist whose life (1932-1988) spanned a pivotal era in the history of Southern letters.  Raised Catholic during the Great Depression, Corrington attended Centenary College and completed a graduate degree in Renaissance literature from Rice University as well as a D.Phil from […]

Jay Langdale

Jay Langdale received his BA from Mercer University, his MA from the Southern Studies Program at the University of Mississippi and his PhD from the University of Florida where he studied under Bertram Wyatt-Brown. His dissertation titled “Superfluous Southerners: Cultural Conservatism and the South” was awarded the 2006 M.E. Bradford Prize by the St. George […]

The Tate of Our Souls: The Lost Cause of the Southern Agrarians

  Essay by James McWilliams Few readers, even the well-read, know much about Allen Tate. Those who do know the arcane American poet—usually professors who teach “southern literature”—would likely not label him a humanitarian. Cerebral, distant, combative, self-obsessed—yes—but not a social reformer in any sense of the term. And yet (a million caveats notwithstanding) there […]

James McWilliams

James McWilliams’s writing has appeared in The Paris Review, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Harper’s, The Washington Post, Slate, The American Scholar, Texas Monthly, The Atlantic, and The Virginia Quarterly Review. His current project is a history of art and expression in the 20th-century American South, tentatively titled The Wild Beautiful Poets We Grow by the Road.

“By the Numbers,” by Jen Lancaster

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl The summer reading season is upon us; park-goers and beach-goers and vacation-goers and back-yard goers are relaxing with sun screen (we hope) and sun glasses and books and magazines.  Children will frolic. So much tonic for the spirit these lovely warm days; more so when readers look for wit and […]