Meet the Editors

Publisher and Executive Editor Philip K. Jason is the author or editor of several books. From 1973 to 2001, he taught English and Creative Writing at United States Naval Academy. Allen Mendenhall is a writer, attorney, and educator. He has taught in a university, a law school, a penitentiary, and a Japanese private school. RIGHT: Photographs by VanessaK Photography, LLC.

The Tate of Our Souls: The Lost Cause of the Southern Agrarians

  Essay by James McWilliams Few readers, even the well-read, know much about Allen Tate. Those who do know the arcane American poet—usually professors who teach “southern literature”—would likely not label him a humanitarian. Cerebral, distant, combative, self-obsessed—yes—but not a social reformer in any sense of the term. And yet (a million caveats notwithstanding) there […]

James McWilliams

James McWilliams’s writing has appeared in The Paris Review, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Harper’s, The Washington Post, Slate, The American Scholar, Texas Monthly, The Atlantic, and The Virginia Quarterly Review. His current project is a history of art and expression in the 20th-century American South, tentatively titled The Wild Beautiful Poets We Grow by the Road.

“By the Numbers,” by Jen Lancaster

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl The summer reading season is upon us; park-goers and beach-goers and vacation-goers and back-yard goers are relaxing with sun screen (we hope) and sun glasses and books and magazines.  Children will frolic. So much tonic for the spirit these lovely warm days; more so when readers look for wit and […]

Allen Mendenhall Interviews Idabel Allen, Author of “Rooted”

AM:  The title of your book is Rooted.  The first line signals that this word, rooted, will take on layers of meaning.  “It all comes from the root,” your narrator says.  “And Grover McQuiston was the root of it all.”  What are you after here?  IA: The opening line of Rooted serves a couple of purposes. As there are […]

“Miss Julia Weathers the Storm,” by Ann B. Ross

Reviewed by Johnnie Bernhard Ann B. Ross, New York Times bestselling author of the “Miss Julia” series, returns with the eighteenth installment, Miss Julia Weathers the Storm. And like the seventeen books before, this comic southern tale makes for great summer reading as protagonist Miss Julie battles a hurricane during a trip to the beach with […]

“The Ex-Suicide,” by Katherine Clark

  Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl A few brief words on this novel’s title, first of all, since it philosophically “lurks.” We know that Walker Percy was no stranger to suicide with a good list of his family members having taken their own lives, and with Percy himself suffering from melancholy, an ailment different from […]

Allen Mendenhall Interviews Emily Carpenter, Author of “The Weight of Lies”

AM: The Weight of Lies is a thriller that critics have labeled as “Southern Gothic.”  Are they right?  EC: I wholeheartedly endorse the Southern Gothic label. There are some other elements at play in the book—bits of romance, horror, and family drama—but overall, I’d really hoped for that delicious moss-draped, muddy, “there’s-something-off-about-this-place” feel you get in […]

July Read of the Month: “Parade of Horribles,” by Rhett DeVane

Reviewed by Donna Meredith Once again, Rhett DeVane captures the essence of life in a small southern town in Parade of Horribles, the seventh installment in her beloved Chattahoochee series. DeVane mines the debilitating nature of fear and the need to forgive in this deeply appealing novel. Jake Witherspoon, familiar to readers of DeVane’s earlier […]