“By the Numbers,” by Jen Lancaster

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl The summer reading season is upon us; park-goers and beach-goers and vacation-goers and back-yard goers are relaxing with sun screen (we hope) and sun glasses and books and magazines.  Children will frolic. So much tonic for the spirit these lovely warm days; more so when readers look for wit and […]

“Miss Julia Weathers the Storm,” by Ann B. Ross

Reviewed by Johnnie Bernhard Ann B. Ross, New York Times bestselling author of the “Miss Julia” series, returns with the eighteenth installment, Miss Julia Weathers the Storm. And like the seventeen books before, this comic southern tale makes for great summer reading as protagonist Miss Julie battles a hurricane during a trip to the beach with […]

“The Ex-Suicide,” by Katherine Clark

  Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl A few brief words on this novel’s title, first of all, since it philosophically “lurks.” We know that Walker Percy was no stranger to suicide with a good list of his family members having taken their own lives, and with Percy himself suffering from melancholy, an ailment different from […]

July Read of the Month: “Parade of Horribles,” by Rhett DeVane

Reviewed by Donna Meredith Once again, Rhett DeVane captures the essence of life in a small southern town in Parade of Horribles, the seventh installment in her beloved Chattahoochee series. DeVane mines the debilitating nature of fear and the need to forgive in this deeply appealing novel. Jake Witherspoon, familiar to readers of DeVane’s earlier […]

“House of Memory,” by Carolyn Haines

Reviewed by Claire Hamner Matturro Something profoundly sinister is on the prowl in central Alabama. It’s the time of the Jazz Age, a spirited respite between national disasters, but what lurks and stalks young women will not be tamed by exuberant dancing or bathtub gin. Whether the evil is spectral or human—or both—is just one […]

“The Language of Vision,” by Joseph R. Millichap

Reviewed by MW Rishell In The Language of Vision: Photography and Southern Literature in the 1930s and After, Joseph R. Millichap mines a rich stock – the literature of the South – and finds a comparatively new vein, that of photography supporting the cultural aura of kudzu and long memory.  Bringing visual rhetoric and the […]

“Ill-Mannered Ghosts,” by Nicole Sarrocco

Reviewed by Bestsy Randolph Nicole Sarrocco’s Ill-Mannered Ghosts is literary fiction at its finest. Sarrocco manages to combine verisimilitude (she herself claims to have seen ghosts) and the paranormal in a freakishly awesome effort to render the semi-credible story of a southern woman (her sometimes real self) who has the uncanny ability to see, hear, […]

June Read of the Month: “Abraham Anyhow,” by Adam Van Winkle

Reviewed by William Bernhardt I am particular about how Oklahoma is portrayed in fiction. Perhaps I’m unduly defensive, but at this point, having written more than almost thirty novels set in Oklahoma, in a variety of time periods, I think I’ve earned the right. I chafe when I hear editors, upon hearing that the novel takes […]