January Read of the Month: “The Ocean’s Edge,” by William Bernhardt

Reviewed by Carl Sennhenn  No one perhaps would suspect, surely not expect, the author of acclaimed and prize-winning mystery novels to write and publish poetry.  But William Bernhardt, the author of the successful Ben Kincaid series, has done just that with two volumes of poetry, The White Bird and now The Ocean’s Edge.  If The […]

“Watershed Days,” by Thorpe Moeckel

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl One might be at a loss with this book absent some context, but even with context one might still be at a loss. Mr. Moeckel’s book covers some two years of occasional vignettes, an even dozen from 2005-2006 and another even dozen from 2006-2007: adventures of a sort. The vignettes, […]

Denise Tolan

Denise Tolan teaches amazing students at Northwest Vista College in San Antonio, Texas. She is a graduate of the Red Earth MFA in Creative Writing Program at Oklahoma City University. Denise has been published in places such as Reed, Apple Valley Review, The Great American Literary Magazine, The Tishman Review, and Gravel. Denise’s creative nonfiction recently […]

December Read of the Month: “Wins and Losses,” by Peter Makuck

Reviewed by Brendan Galvin Wins and Losses is Peter Makuck’s fourth collection of short stories, a dozen to be exact, and as in the earlier three books his settings are mostly blue collar towns and his characters are usually middle-class Americans, sometimes retired, sometimes trying to get by in questionable financial weather. Makuck was a […]

Brendan Galvin

Brendan Galvin is the author of several books of poetry, including Winter Oysters (1983); Hotel Malabar (1998), winner of the Iowa Poetry Prize; Habitat (2005), a finalist for the National Book Award; Ocean Effects (2007); and Egg Island Almanac (2017), which won the Crab Orchard Series. His work has appeared in hundreds of journals, textbooks, and […]

“South of the Etowah,” by Raymond L. Atkins

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl The “Etowah” in the title to Raymond L. Atkins’s recently published book refers to a 164-mile-long waterway rising in northwest Georgia to begin flowing south and then west through Rome, Georgia. If one had the interest, one might build a raft and, Huckleberry-like, float along through Alabama down to Mobile […]

“A Sensory History of the Civil War,” by Mark M. Smith

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl There’s an online collection now providing access to over 7,000 different photographic views and portraits made during the American Civil War.  The images represent the original glass plate negatives photographed under the supervision of Mathew Brady and Alexander Gardner. The images are powerful: the dead about to be interred at […]

“Honey from the Lion” and “Allegheny Front,” by Matthew Neill Null

Reviewed by Donna Meredith The land itself and male characters dominate the early works of West Virginia author Matthew Neill Null. They include the literary novel Honey from the Lion (Lookout Books, 2015) and a short story collection, Allegheny Front (Sarabande Books, 2016), which won the Mary McCarthy Prize in Short Fiction. If there is […]