Search Results for: last treasure

March Read of the Month: “The Last Treasure,” by Erika Marks

Reviewed by Donna Meredith Erika Marks’s latest novel, The Last Treasure, is a delicious romance, well-timed to capitalize on the current Hamilton frenzy. Hamilton assassin Aaron Burr’s daughter Theodosia is one of those lost aboard the Patriot, a schooner which disappeared without a trace in 1813 off the Carolina coast during a storm. The novel’s […]

June Read of the Month: “Faith Bass Darling’s Last Garage Sale,” by Lynda Rutledge

Review by Andy Johnson. Amy Einhorn Books /G.P. Putnam’s Sons (Penguin). Hardcover. 289 pages. $25.95 In this, Lynda Rutledge’s first novel, God commands ailing Texas widow Faith Bass Darling to sell her Louis XV Elephant Clock, an heirloom wedding ring, a banker’s rolltop desk, a rare Dance Dragoon pistol, 44 signed Tiffany lamps, a portrait […]

“Historic Alabama Courthouses: A Century of Their Images and Stories,” by Delos Hughes

Reviewed by Julia Jordan Weller If the walls of courthouses could talk, they would whisper the experiences of those who worked, litigated, and governed over the last 150 years or more.  Some courtrooms have evolved from open air forums, such as those held in Wedowee until 1836, to some of the grand domed buildings that […]

“The Velvet Hours,” by Alyson Richman

Reviewed by Donna Meredith In The Velvet Hours, Alyson Richman explores two different eras in Paris, the Belle Epoque and the lead-up to Hitler’s Nazi invasion, each rendered with meticulous attention to detail. The novel would be a fine read as a multi-generational romance, but it soars beyond that convention because it was inspired by […]

“To The Disappearance,” by Todd Fuller

Reviewed by MW Rishell If Todd Fuller were a baseball player, he’d make a lot of money.  In the terms of the diamond, he can play many positions and can play them all well.  Someone like Ben Zobrist comes to mind (for you baseball fans).  And he would do something highly experimental and inconceivable, like […]

“Where the Souls Go,” by Ann Hite

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl Ann Hite’s Where the Souls Go is subtitled “A Black Mountain Novel.”  It’s the third in her series of novels rooted in this complicated, mystical, wispy place. For the geographically challenged, North Carolina’s Black Mountain is part of the Blue Ridge and Smoky Mountains region, old mountains steeped in mystery […]

“It’s Not Like I Knew Her,” by Pat Spears

Reviewed by Donna Meredith It’s Not Like I Knew Her, by Pat Spears, shines as a classic coming-of-age story exploring a young woman’s poignant awakening of forbidden desire. This Tallahassee writer and Florida State University graduate wrangles words with the clarity and style of a true wordsmith. Her sentences percolate with the right rhythms and […]

“Bill Corrington, From Poetry to ‘Killer Bees’: A Personal Interview,” by Louis Gallo

A personal interview transcribed from long out-of-print and defunct The Courier—the Weekly Newspaper of New Orleans (Nov 27-Dec3, 1975) in hopes of greater dissemination circa 2016. —Louis Gallo This piece is reproduced directly from the crumbling newsprint pages of the original Courier edition.  It describes a very much alive Bill Corrington in 1975.  Some current […]