Meet the Editors

Publisher and Executive Editor Philip K. Jason is the author or editor of several books. From 1973 to 2001, he taught English and Creative Writing at United States Naval Academy. Allen Mendenhall is a writer, attorney, and educator. He has taught in a university, a law school, a penitentiary, and a Japanese private school. RIGHT: Photographs by VanessaK Photography, LLC.


The Southern Literary Review celebrates southern authors and their contributions to American literature.  We feature the classic writers who have defined southern literature, and we highlight emerging authors through interviews, profiles, and book reviews. In an effort to back independent bookstores and to encourage creativity in the publishing world, SLR is an IndieBound supporter.  

“This Republic of Suffering,” by Drew Gilpin Faust

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl The “Preface” to Drew Gilpin Faust’s This Republic of Suffering begins with a pointed sentence:  “Mortality defines the human condition.”  True in any and all circumstances, including driving to work in the morning or returning home in the evening. Driving our cars, however, is unlike Confederate and Union soldiers gathered […]

“Long-Legged Rosie – Murder in Myrtle Beach,” by Troy D. Nooe

Reviewed by Betsy Randolph Troy D. Nooe’s mystery novel Long-Legged Rosie – Murder in Myrtle Beach transports us back to a simpler time in crime fiction, when gangsters wore pinstriped suits and had the decency to shoot each other face-to-face, often after a brief exchange of insults or perceived wrongs. It’s the 1940’s.  Nooe’s protagonist, […]

Betsy Randolph

Betsy Randolph grew up in Oklahoma where she worked in radio broadcasting before beginning her career in law enforcement in 1990 in her birth state of New Mexico. She holds numerous degrees in Journalism, Organizational Leadership, and Horticulture, and a Master’s of Fine Arts in Creative Writing. She’s the past-President and Vice President of the Logan […]

“Conjuror,” by Holly Sullivan McClure

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl Anyone driving east on Interstate 40 and crossing from Tennessee into western North Carolina will cross over U.S. Route 19 running roughly northeast-by-southwest.  Near the intersection of Route 19 and U. S. Route 441 is the Oconaluftee River Valley and the Qualla Boundary land trust. The area has an interesting […]

October Read of the Month: “Edge of the Wind,” by James E. Cherry

Reviewed by Ryan Guth I was watching an episode of The West Wing a few nights ago on Netflix. As a group of President Bartlet’s staffers walked into a blues club in DC, I suddenly found myself thinking that would have amused an acquaintance of mine … only I couldn’t quite recall his name. Then […]

“Undead Souths,” edited by Eric Gary Anderson, Taylor Hagood, and Daniel Cross Turner

Reviewed by Joshua S. Fullman This volume follows countless others in their earnest curiosity about Southern identification and expression. For many Southerners, their region represents all that is/was great about the American heritage. For many others, it is something un-American, anti-American, or sub-human. Efforts to understand the South by both her defenders and detractors have […]

Ryan Guth

Ryan Guth is the author of two full-length mixed-genre collections, Home Truths (Alsop Review Press, 2006) and Body and Soul (Lummox Press, 2015). Individual poems of his have appeared in such journals such as Lummox, Iron Horse, Bryant Literary Review, River City, and Third Coast Review. He studied Creative Writing with poets Andrew Hudgins, Don […]

“The Pink House,” by Trish MacEnulty

Reviewed by Donna Meredith Trish MacEnulty’s smooth delivery of four very different female viewpoints in The Pink House creates a rich reading experience to savor like a tasty casserole. Each narrator has a compelling story and unique problems that meld into a riveting whole. The action centers around a women’s prison in North Florida, a […]