Meet the Editors

Publisher and Executive Editor Philip K. Jason is the author or editor of several books. From 1973 to 2001, he taught English and Creative Writing at United States Naval Academy. Allen Mendenhall is a writer, attorney, and educator. He has taught in a university, a law school, a penitentiary, and a Japanese private school. RIGHT: Photographs by VanessaK Photography, LLC.

Welcome!

The Southern Literary Review celebrates southern authors and their contributions to American literature.  We feature the classic writers who have defined southern literature, and we highlight emerging authors through interviews, profiles, and book reviews. In an effort to back independent bookstores and to encourage creativity in the publishing world, SLR is an IndieBound supporter.  

“It’s Not Like I Knew Her,” by Pat Spears

Reviewed by Donna Meredith It’s Not Like I Knew Her, by Pat Spears, shines as a classic coming-of-age story exploring a young woman’s poignant awakening of forbidden desire. This Tallahassee writer and Florida State University graduate wrangles words with the clarity and style of a true wordsmith. Her sentences percolate with the right rhythms and […]

“The Cigar Factory: A Novel of Charleston,” by Michele Moore

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl I recall my first visit to Charleston a year or so after Hurricane Hugo.  Driving south to north along the coastal roads, I made side trips into the South Carolina Low Country where I found isolation and the remnants of the Gullah people.  I had been unbeknownst driving along and […]

“Life Through These Eyes,” by Michael S. Lambiotte

Reviewed by Donna Meredith Life Through These Eyes is a collection of over a hundred thoughtful, short personal essays by West Virginia native Michael S. Lambiotte. A few of these essays, first published as columns for a local newspaper, are specific to life in Clarksburg, but most would strike a chord of familiarity with people […]

“Dancing with Langston Hughes,” Essay by M.W. Rishell

We should always be wary of posthumous publications, as it is likely the author held the work back for one reason or another.  Seldom are things simply lost to time.  But the hunger for more work from our departed authors of legend always overrules these reservations.  The New Yorker has circulated, online on May 30 […]

“Reckoning and Ruin,” by Tina Whittle

Reviewed by Philip K. Jason I have finally caught up with Tina Whittle’s Tai Randolph Mystery series, now in its fifth installment. Set in Atlanta and Savannah, this tale of crime, family, retribution, and Old South/New South contrasts and continuities has plenty of energy and strong characters. It’s main center of interest, however, is not […]

“Friday Afternoon and Other Stories,” by T. D. Johnston

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl The phrase “twilight zone” has likely become iconic in American culture.  Episodes from the television series contained elements of drama, suspense or horror, and aspects of the macabre.  Gauntlet Press has published collections of original “The Twilight Zone” scripts, some with Rod Serlings’s hand-written edits.  A former student of mine […]

“Bill Corrington, From Poetry to ‘Killer Bees’: A Personal Interview,” by Louis Gallo

A personal interview transcribed from long out-of-print and defunct The Courier—the Weekly Newspaper of New Orleans (Nov 27-Dec3, 1975) in hopes of greater dissemination circa 2016. —Louis Gallo This piece is reproduced directly from the crumbling newsprint pages of the original Courier edition.  It describes a very much alive Bill Corrington in 1975.  Some current […]

June Read of the Month: “Damn Yankees,” by George C. Rable

Reviewed by Joshua S. Fullman From cinematic accounts alone, one might be tempted to conclude that the American Civil War brought out the better angels of our nature instead of our devils. Indeed, one does not need to go all the way back to Selznick’s Gone With the Wind to find romantic portraits of nineteenth-century […]