Meet the Editors

Publisher and Executive Editor Philip K. Jason is the author or editor of several books. From 1973 to 2001, he taught English and Creative Writing at United States Naval Academy. Allen Mendenhall is a writer, attorney, and educator. He has taught in a university, a law school, a penitentiary, and a Japanese private school. RIGHT: Photographs by VanessaK Photography, LLC.

Welcome!

The Southern Literary Review celebrates southern authors and their contributions to American literature.  We feature the classic writers who have defined southern literature, and we highlight emerging authors through interviews, profiles, and book reviews. In an effort to back independent bookstores and to encourage creativity in the publishing world, SLR is an IndieBound supporter.  

“Undead Souths,” edited by Eric Gary Anderson, Taylor Hagood, and Daniel Cross Turner

Reviewed by Joshua S. Fullman This volume follows countless others in their earnest curiosity about Southern identification and expression. For many Southerners, their region represents all that is/was great about the American heritage. For many others, it is something un-American, anti-American, or sub-human. Efforts to understand the South by both her defenders and detractors have […]

Ryan Guth

Ryan Guth is the author of two full-length mixed-genre collections, Home Truths (Alsop Review Press, 2006) and Body and Soul (Lummox Press, 2015). Individual poems of his have appeared in such journals such as Lummox, Iron Horse, Bryant Literary Review, River City, and Third Coast Review. He studied Creative Writing with poets Andrew Hudgins, Don […]

“The Pink House,” by Trish MacEnulty

Reviewed by Donna Meredith Trish MacEnulty’s smooth delivery of four very different female viewpoints in The Pink House creates a rich reading experience to savor like a tasty casserole. Each narrator has a compelling story and unique problems that meld into a riveting whole. The action centers around a women’s prison in North Florida, a […]

“Don’t Date Baptists—and other things my mother told me,” by Terry Barr

Reviewed by Walter Bennett Terry Barr’s Don’t Date Baptists is foremost a book of stories—an almost stream-of-consciousness narrative—about a boy’s coming to manhood and moral awareness in the deep South of the 1950s, 60s, and 70s, a propitious time and place indeed to be the son of a Jewish father and Methodist mother. And that […]

Walter Bennett

Walter Bennett is a former civil rights attorney, judge, and law professor who lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.  He is the author of The Lawyer’s Myth: Reviving Ideals in the Legal Profession (University of Chicago Press, 2001) and the novel Leaving Tuscaloosa (Fuze Publishing, 2012).  He is a native of Tuscaloosa, Alabama. 

Claire Hamner Matturro Interviews Carolyn Haines, Author of “Book of the Beloved”

CHM: Carolyn, you’ve written 16 Sarah Booth Delany books, and an abundance of other stand-alone books, and here you are, starting a new series with the Pluto’s Snitch Mysteries. I read where you’ve written over 50 books, but then again, I’ve read where you wrote over 70. Just how many books have you written? CH:  […]

September Read of the Month: “Book of the Beloved,” by Carolyn Haines

Reviewed by Claire Hamner Matturro The amazing Carolyn Haines is at it again. The compelling, complex and darkly fascinating Book of the Beloved illustrates all over again just how talented and versatile the award-winning Haines is as a writer. Beloved is a book you won’t be able to put down, Southern to the core, and […]

“Miss Julia Inherits a Mess,” by Ann B. Ross

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl About a decade ago a television series began its run: Gossip Girl.  It was a teen drama based on a novel series by Cecily von Ziegesar.  Fictional lives, then, of a batch of adolescents, queen bees in their gossipy chess games.  It takes little imagination to add, say, fifty gossipy […]