Meet the Editors

Publisher and Executive Editor Philip K. Jason is the author or editor of several books. From 1973 to 2001, he taught English and Creative Writing at United States Naval Academy. Allen Mendenhall is a writer, attorney, and educator. He has taught in a university, a law school, a penitentiary, and a Japanese private school. RIGHT: Photographs by VanessaK Photography, LLC.

Welcome!

The Southern Literary Review celebrates southern authors and their contributions to American literature.  We feature the classic writers who have defined southern literature, and we highlight emerging authors through interviews, profiles, and book reviews. In an effort to back independent bookstores and to encourage creativity in the publishing world, SLR is an IndieBound supporter.  

David Huddle Interviews Julia Nunnally Duncan, Author of “A Part of Me”

DH: Julia, I very much appreciate the basic premise of A Part of Me—that deeply felt experiences with other people become a part of our identity.  What can you tell us about this idea and how it came to you? JND: For some time I’ve been writing from memory and personal experience in both my […]

David Huddle

David Huddle holds degrees from the University of Virginia, Hollins College, and Columbia University.  Originally from Ivanhoe, Virginia, he taught for 38 years at the University of Vermont, then served three years as Distinguished Visiting Professor of Creative Writing at Hollins University. He also held the 2012-2013 Roy Acuff Chair of Excellence in the Creative […]

“Burials,” by Mary Anna Evans

Reviewed by Claire Hamner Matturro Burials, the tenth Dr. Faye Longchamp-Mantooth archaeological mystery by master-writer Mary Anna Evans, begins with a bang. Literally. Faye and her client are hiding under a pick-up in Oklahoma as somebody shoots at them. Though the precise motive and identity of the shooter will not be revealed until the end, […]

March Read of the Month: “The Last Treasure,” by Erika Marks

Reviewed by Donna Meredith Erika Marks’s latest novel, The Last Treasure, is a delicious romance, well-timed to capitalize on the current Hamilton frenzy. Hamilton assassin Aaron Burr’s daughter Theodosia is one of those lost aboard the Patriot, a schooner which disappeared without a trace in 1813 off the Carolina coast during a storm. The novel’s […]

“Prayers the Devil Answers,” by Sharyn McCrumb

Reviewed by Johnnie Bernhard Sharyn McCrumb’s Prayers the Devil Answers is a satisfying novel with interwoven subplots and gifts of dialogue and character development.  The reader is transported to rural Tennessee during the Great Depression as the novel’s heroine, Ellie Robbins, carves out a life for herself and her children, despite the shroud of poverty, superstition, […]

“A Unique Perspective as a Literary Agent and an Author,” by Johnnie Bernhard

A dual point-of-view as a literary agent and an author gives me a unique perspective into both the traditional publishing and writer’s world.  It often reminds me of the nonfiction bestseller by John Gray, Men are from Mars and Women are from Venus. Men need women; women need men, so, as a facilitator, Gray invites us […]

Allen Mendenhall Interviews Bren McClain, Author of “One Good Mama Bone”

AM:  Thanks for the interview, Bren.  Before we talk about your new book, One Good Mama Bone, I’d like to mention something we have in common: We both studied English at Furman University.  Who were your professors there? BM:  Dr. Stanley Crowe was my adviser.  Also Dr. Pate, Gil Allen and Ann Sharp.  Loved them. […]

“One Good Mama Bone,” by Bren McClain

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl To begin: This is a book about a woman who talks to a cow and comes to believe she can learn some things from the cow, Big Mama Red, whose child is a steer named Lucky. The woman is Sarah Creamer and the novel is set in the 1950s in […]