Meet the Editors

Publisher and Executive Editor Philip K. Jason is the author or editor of several books. From 1973 to 2001, he taught English and Creative Writing at United States Naval Academy. Allen Mendenhall is associate dean at Faulkner University Thomas Goode Jones School of Law. Donna Meredith is the widely acclaimed author of several books, and a distinguished journalist and reviewer. RIGHT: Photographs by VanessaK Photography, LLC.

Welcome!

The Southern Literary Review celebrates southern authors and their contributions to American literature.  We feature the classic writers who have defined southern literature, and we highlight emerging authors through interviews, profiles, and book reviews. In an effort to back independent bookstores and to encourage creativity in the publishing world, SLR is an IndieBound supporter.  

“Snakehunter” and “Last Mountain Dancer,” by Chuck Kinder

Reviewed by Donna Meredith Snakehunter and Last Mountain Dancer: Hard-Earned Lessons in Love, Loss, and Honky-Tonk Outlaw Life, by Chuck Kinder, offer a glimpse into the wide-ranging styles mastered by one of West Virginia’s most talented authors. Each of his four books is unique and wholly original in approach. His writing eschews the formulaic, the […]

“All the Lovely Children,” by Andrew Nance

Reviewed by Claire Hamner Matturro Andrew Nance does two very difficult things in his new book, All the Lovely Children (Red Adept, 2018), and he does both exceptionally well. First, Nance infuses the often-formulaic serial killer subgenre with fresh, new energy by providing innovative twists, a lush setting that juxtaposes beauty and horror, and sharp, […]

August Read of the Month: “To Lay to Rest Our Ghosts,” by Caitlin Hamilton Summie

Reviewed by Adele Annesi It’s been said we can’t go home again, but home is a stubborn traveler that tags along in our prickliest family and friends, the people we are and become, the places that fill the heart as no one person can. To Lay to Rest Our Ghosts, by Caitlin Hamilton Summie, is […]

“Paradise Lost: A Life of F. Scott Fitzgerald,” by David S. Brown

Reviewed by James Baresel The location in which he placed the first meeting of Jay Gatsby and Daisy Fay is unlikely to be among the best remembers features of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s famous novel.  Louisville can seem a random setting for their introduction to each other, chosen for its proximity to the Midwest which was home […]

James Baresel

James Baresel has a Master of Arts in philosophy from Franciscan University and a Bachelor of Arts in history from the University of Cincinnati.  He has taught high school classes in English, Latin and the history of art and now works as a freelance writer.

“The Sisters of Glass Ferry,” by Kim Michele Richardson

Reviewed by Philip K. Jason This spellbinding new novel by the author of Liar’s Bench and GodPretty in the Tobacco Field powerfully blends teenage angst, a rich portrait of the American South, the blessings and curses of twinship, and the inevitably destructive nature of secrets. Ms. Richardson provides rich dosses of sensory imagery, emotional stress, […]

“Rear View,” An Essay by Louis Gallo

Essay by Louis Gallo A history with scandalous cameo personalities* While away in grad school I sent weekly book reviews to Vieux Carre Courier, an alternative, low-budget newspaper owned by lawyer Jim Derbes and his wife, Ginny.  Jim was an old friend from my early teen years.  We had met, weirdly enough, over the forty […]

“Dreams of Falling,” by Karen White

Reviewed by Donna Meredith Dreams of Falling showcases Karen White’s considerable talents in a moving multi-generational story of complicated friendships, closely-held secrets, a mysterious fire, and suspicious death. A New York Times best-selling author, White has penned over twenty novels beloved by her fans. Set in Georgetown, South Carolina, Dreams of Falling focuses on two […]