Archives for June 2017

“House of Memory,” by Carolyn Haines

Reviewed by Claire Hamner Matturro Something profoundly sinister is on the prowl in central Alabama. It’s the time of the Jazz Age, a spirited respite between national disasters, but what lurks and stalks young women will not be tamed by exuberant dancing or bathtub gin. Whether the evil is spectral or human—or both—is just one […]

Allen Mendenhall Interviews Jessica Hooten Wilson

AM:  You’ve written three books in quick succession that should appeal to readers of Southern Literary Review.  The first involves Flannery O’Connor, and the second and third, Walker Percy.  I’d like to start by asking about the second book, Walker Percy, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and the Search for Influence, because I’m also interested in notions of influence.  Read […]

“The Language of Vision,” by Joseph R. Millichap

Reviewed by MW Rishell In The Language of Vision: Photography and Southern Literature in the 1930s and After, Joseph R. Millichap mines a rich stock – the literature of the South – and finds a comparatively new vein, that of photography supporting the cultural aura of kudzu and long memory.  Bringing visual rhetoric and the […]

Allen Mendenhall Interviews Amber D. Tran, Author of “Moon River”

AM: So glad for the opportunity to talk to you about your debut novel, Moon River. Before we get into the book, I want to ask about your background.  I noticed you’re a graduate of West Virginia University.  I studied English for my master’s at WVU and graduated from law school at WVU.  Did you […]

“Ill-Mannered Ghosts,” by Nicole Sarrocco

Reviewed by Bestsy Randolph Nicole Sarrocco’s Ill-Mannered Ghosts is literary fiction at its finest. Sarrocco manages to combine verisimilitude (she herself claims to have seen ghosts) and the paranormal in a freakishly awesome effort to render the semi-credible story of a southern woman (her sometimes real self) who has the uncanny ability to see, hear, […]

June Read of the Month: “Abraham Anyhow,” by Adam Van Winkle

Reviewed by William Bernhardt I am particular about how Oklahoma is portrayed in fiction. Perhaps I’m unduly defensive, but at this point, having written more than almost thirty novels set in Oklahoma, in a variety of time periods, I think I’ve earned the right. I chafe when I hear editors, upon hearing that the novel takes […]