Archives for October 2015

John Ryan Hrebik

Dr. John Ryan Hrebik is a writing professor, lyric poet, and drummer/musician. He holds a Ph.D. in Composition and Rhetoric from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, as well as an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from Chatham University. John’s writing style combines the lyric quality of Anna Akhmatova with the stoic sensibility of Jane Kenyon. His poems […]

“Silent We Stood,” by Henry Chapell

Reviewed by Donna Meredith Extensive research led to a compelling depiction of Dallas, Texas, just before the Civil War in Henry Chapell’s novel, Silent We Stood. The story develops from a fire that destroyed much of the city in 1860, when fear of slave rebellion gripped the South following John Brown’s raid at Harper’s Ferry. […]

“Slab,” by Selah Saterstrom

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl It’s been about four decades since the now mythologized Merwin incident at Naropa, chronicled by Tom Clark in a Cadmus Edition titled The Great Naropa Poetry Wars. In many respects, the incident is now like an epitaph for very different kinds of writing, the very charged, passionate and declamatory style […]

“Isolation,” by Mary Anna Evans

Reviewed by Claire Hamner Matturro Isolation is Mary Anna Evans’s writing at its finest—which is saying a lot for this award-winning author. Evans has long been adept at blending history, archaeology, mystery and domestic drama into riveting tales, smoothly written and well laced with the homegrown humidity and lushness of her native South. She’s conjured […]

“Miss Dreamsville and the Lost Heiress of Collier County,” by Amy Hill Hearth

Reviewed by Philip K. Jason This review originally appeared in Florida Weekly. It is reprinted here with the permission of Florida Weekly. This sequel to Miss Dreamsville and the Collier County Women’s Literary Society (2012) should satisfy those who filled the many book club appearances through which the earlier title was effectively marketed. It inches […]

“Journey to the Wilderness: War, Memory, and a Southern Family’s Civil War Letters,” by Frye Gaillard

Reviewed by Rod Davis A beautifully written personal and moral quest in search of insufferable truths, Frye Gaillard’s Journey to the Wilderness brings as much clarity to the lingering darkness in the Southern soul in a few emotionally honest pages as I have seen in volumes of hagiography, professional Southernism and clichéd pensives that plague […]

Rod Davis

Rod Davis is the author of a number of works including the Southwest/PEN Award-winning novel Corina’s Way, and most recently the critically praised South, America.

“Untying the Moon,” by Ellen Malphrus

Reviewed by Daniel James Sundahl It’s been four decades since Harold Bloom published The Anxiety of Influence. Bloom’s theory is that creative writers are hindered in their work because they maintain ambiguous relationships with precursor writers. He’s enlarged his theory these days by referencing precursor writers as “daemons.” I mention this because in his foreword […]