Archives for September 2015

Elisabeth Aiken

Elisabeth Aiken is Assistant Professor of English at Saint Leo University. She holds a Ph.D. from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and has degrees from James Madison University and Western Carolina University. Elisabeth considers the mountains of western North Carolina her home, and her favorite literature has a distinctly Southern flavor.

“Cutting Loose in Paradise,” by Mary Jane Ryals

Reviewed by Claire Hamner Matturro Cutting Loose in Paradise (Pineapple Press, 2015) by Mary Jane Ryals is a charming, quirky Florida environmental mystery full of local color, intriguing and unique characters, poetry-quality language, lushly evoked landscapes, a twisty-turny plot, and just the right touch of wry humor. Though Ryals is the author of several books […]

“Half of What I Say Is Meaningless,” by Joseph Bathanti

Reviewed by Frederick Parker The way I see it, memoir should do more than tell a story. It should chomp at the bit to reveal something, maybe truths about who authors really are when nobody is looking, or encoded realities waiting for just the right moment to show themselves. I want memoirs that leave me […]

Fred Parker

Fred Parker is a retired architect and MFA (nonfiction) candidate at Georgia College and State University. He holds a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Auburn University. Much of his career has been devoted to writing in the fields of architecture, engineering, and marketing.

“The Forsaken,” by Ace Atkins

Reviewed by Yasser El-Sayed Let me begin with a disclaimer – not only is The Forsaken my first Quinn Colson novel, it is in fact the first Ace Atkins book I have ever read. One can argue that a work of literature can and should stand on its own, so why not have it reviewed […]

“The Best of Enemies,” by Jen Lancaster

Reviewed by Daniel Sundahl I was at lunch one time with a group of students who were regaling me with the comedy antics of Seinfeld. I asked how many years the program had been on television and about favorite characters. It went from there. I confessed having watched only a few episodes, reruns at that […]

Writing Without Fear: Poetic Language in Tim Peeler’s “Knuckle Bear”

Essay by Patrick Bizzarro One of the most interesting features of Tim Peeler’s Knuckle Bear is the language spoken by the three characters who enact, through thought processes revealed in the poems they speak, the drama of their social relations. Here is an example of that language and the hierarchy of power it constructs in […]

Patrick Bizzaro

Patrick Bizzaro has published nine books and chapbooks of poetry, two critical studies of Fred Chappell’s poetry and fiction, a book on the pedagogy of academic creative writing, some textbooks, and hundreds of poems in magazines. He taught for many years at Indiana University of Pennsylvania and East Carolina University.