Archives for July 2015

New Fiction on Black Middle-Class Families and Universal Themes

Review essay by Donna Meredith African American fiction writers have, for the most part, overlooked middle-class families as subjects until recently. Stacy Campbell, Lamarr White, and Barbara Joe Williams are among the new authors producing strong novels with middle-class characters and universal appeal. Their protagonists, all educated professionals, struggle with issues like mental illness, infidelity, […]

Allen Mendenhall Interviews Hubert Crouch, Author of “The Word”

  AM: Thanks for taking the time to talk to Southern Literary Review about The Word, your second novel. Jace Forman, the protagonist of your first novel, Cried For No One, is back in this novel. How has your experience as a trial lawyer shaped Jace’s character, if at all? Is it even possible to […]

“Go Set a Watchman,” by Harper Lee

“Killing Atticus” Review by Angela Shaw-Thornburg On July 10th, I watched the Confederacy lose one of its final battles on the grounds of the State House in South Carolina. The Confederate battle flag whisked down the pole into the waiting hands of two honor guardsmen. They methodically rolled it up into a silky little package […]

Angela Shaw-Thornburg

Angela Shaw-Thornburg is an Associate Professor of English, American and African-American Literature at South Carolina State University.  She earned her Ph.D. in English from Rutgers University and has authored many publications.

“Fate Moreland’s Widow,” by John Lane

Reviewed by Daniel Sundahl There was a time when the Canaan River had been left free to run through the valley, years before the senior George McCane harnessed “the power of falling water” (emphasis added). Ben Crocker, the first-person narrator of the novel, makes this observation in 1988, a half-century after the events that developed […]

Daniel Sundahl

Daniel James Sundahl is Emeritus Professor in American Studies and English at Hillsdale College where he taught for  over 32 years.  Prior to retirement he was Kirk Distinguished Professor in American Studies.  He’s relocated from Michigan to South Carolina.

“Fate Moreland’s Widow,” by John Lane, and “Seam Busters,” by Mary Hood

Reviewed by Donna Meredith We all—well, all of us except Lady Godiva, nudists, and that one infamous Emperor of fairytale fame—wear clothes. Yet most of us give little thought to the mill workers who create the fabrics or the seamstresses who sew them. Two recent fiction releases from the University of South Carolina Press explore […]

July Read of the Month: “A Tree Born Crooked,” by Steph Post

Reviewed by Phil Jason I almost missed this one, which is among the most original and striking Florida novels I’ve encountered in my almost nine years of walking this beat. No gorgeously hued Sunshine State here. This is the Florida of grit and grime state: the North Florida that is really Southern, rather than the […]