Archives for March 2015

Allen Mendenhall Interviews Tom Turner, Author of “Palm Beach Nasty”

AM:  Hi, Tom.  Thanks for talking to us about your new novel, Palm Beach Nasty.  It’s a crime thriller, and we don’t have a chance to feature many crime thrillers—a genre that’s very popular.  What brought you to the genre? TT:  Thanks for interviewing me, Allen. In answer to your question: Honestly, when I started […]

“The Land Breakers,” by John Ehle

Reviewed by Donna Meredith John Ehle’s The Land Breakers transports readers to the mountains of North Carolina in 1779, when settlers first breach the virgin forests and wrestle a primitive life from the land. More completely and accurately than any other author, Ehle conveys the struggle involved in settling this rugged territory by immersing us […]

Allen Mendenhall Interviews F. Diane Pickett, Author of “Never Isn’t Long Enough”

AM: Hi, Diane. You were born in Atlanta. So was I, in Piedmont Hospital. And you live in Destin now, where I spent many weeks of my childhood. We’ve probably crossed paths at some point. Where do you do your writing down there at the beach? FDP: I was born at Emory University Hospital. I […]

“Fire Shut Up In My Bones,” by Charles Blow

Reviewed by Norwood Holland Fire Shut Up In My Bones is Charles Blow’s memoir about growing up a black male in the American South; it depicts a spectrum of rural-life experiences in which coming-of-age involves leaving behind a secret past. On a mural-sized canvas with deft brush strokes, Blow’s memoir paints a picture of complicated […]

Norwood Holland

Norwood Holland is a freelance writer, lawyer, and author of the Drew Smith legal thriller series based on the capers of a D.C. trial attorney. A graduate of Howard University School of Law, he earned a bachelor’s degree in English from Fisk University where he studied under the renowned Harlem Renaissance author Arna Bontemps. Holland […]

March Read of the Month: “A Cuban in Mayberry,” by Gustavo Pérez Firmat

Reviewed by Miles Smith IV When Gustavo Pérez Firmat told a fellow Cubano he planned to write a work on The Andy Griffith Show, his friend lamented that this was an americanada project, meaning that it was typically Anglo-American and beneath a cultured Cubano scholar. Firmat’s project became more than a simple exploration of mid-twentieth […]

Allen Mendenhall Interviews David Joy, Author of Where All Light Tends to Go

AM: We’re thrilled to interview you at Southern Literary Review, David. Thank you. Your novel is Where All Light Tends to Go, a story about the underbelly of North Carolina, where outlawing is, the opening lines tell us, “as much a matter of blood as hair color and height.” Tell us how Jacob McNeely, your […]