Archives for July 2014

“Battlegrounds of Memory,” by Clay Lewis

Reviewed by Yasser El-Sayed In Battlegrounds of Memory, Clay Lewis traces a rich and conflicted trajectory of loss, pain and redemption over the course of generations. This slim book is a uniquely American story that is narrated with unflinching honesty and infused with such elemental raw emotion that its ultimate achievement lies far beyond a […]

Yasser El-Sayed

Yasser El-Sayed has recently published fiction in Natural Bridge, The New Orphic Review, The Marlboro Review, Red Truck Review, and elsewhere. His short stories have been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and Best American Short Stories. Yasser’s prose focuses upon the intersections of Arab and American experience both in the Middle East and the United […]

“The Salvation of Miss Lucretia,” by Ted Dunagan

Reviewed by Mollie Waters The Salvation of Miss Lucretia is the fourth installment in Ted Dunagan’s series for young adult readers. The books feature two young boys, one white and one black, who are able to overcome the difficulties of the segregated South during the 1940s in order to form a lasting friendship. In their […]

“The Secret of Magic,” by Deborah Johnson

Review by Donna Meredith The fiftieth anniversary of the Freedom Summer is the perfect time for the release of Deborah Johnson’s novel, The Secret of Magic. Johnson’s story reminds us in a powerful way how severe the effects of racism were just a short time ago, yet the novel’s achievements go far beyond a simple […]

“Dream Chaser,” by Pat Spears

Review by Donna Meredith Dream Chaser, by Pat Spears, delivers an iconic figure as the protagonist: a Southern blue collar drunk struggling to hold onto a job and his family. That’s hardly a new story, but the author renders Jesse McKnight with such compassion and prose so perfect that Dream Chaser easily ranks as one […]

William Bernhardt

William Bernhardt is the author of more than thirty books, including the Ben Kincaid novels, the historical novel Nemesis: The Final Case of Eliot Ness (currently being adapted into a television mini-series), a series of books on fiction writing, and most recently, a book of poetry, The White Bird. In addition, Bernhardt founded the Red […]

“From Proper Nouns to Slant Sonnets: A Conversation with Poet Anya Silver About Place and Time”

Sarah Hughes Interviews Anya Silver Sara Hughes: I am so excited to sit down with you and discuss your second collection of poems. For readers who are unfamiliar with your work, breast cancer is a major topic you write about, so we want to make sure we talk about it, but I’m also really interested […]

July Read of the Month: “I Watched You Disappear,” by Anya Krugovoy Silver

Reviewed by Sara Hughes When offering advice to writers, Henry James said, “Try to be one of those on whom nothing is lost.” In her second collection of poetry, I Watched You Disappear, Anya Silver demonstrates that she is a poet “on whom nothing is lost.” Constantly observing life through the lens of memory and […]