Archives for March 2014

“The Prayer Box,” by Lisa Wingate

Reviewed by Mollie Smith Waters Although it is rare to read a book that will change one’s perspective on life, it is not all that uncommon to learn a valuable life lesson from a good read. Such is the case with Lisa Wingate’s The Prayer Box, a solid story with a clear message: do not […]

Allen Mendenhall Interviews James Elkins About Law, Literature, Poetry, and Teaching

AM:  Jim, thank you for doing this interview.  You recently came out with a book, Lawyer Poets and That World We Call Law.  You’ve been researching and writing about lawyer poets for some time now.  What is it about lawyer poets that fascinates you, and what is it about this type of person that makes him […]

Red Truck Review Interviews SLR Managing Editor Allen Mendenhall

The inaugural issue of Red Truck Review: A Journal of American Southern Literature and Culture ran this week and featured this interview and these poems by managing editor Allen Mendenhall.  The interview begins with questions about Southern Literary Review and discusses Allen’s recently published book, Literature and Liberty.  Red Truck Review is edited by SLR contributor Amy Susan […]

“Down and Out in Bugtussle, The Mad Fat Road to Happiness,” by Stephanie McAfee

Reviewed by Amy Susan Wilson Down and Out in Bugtussle, The Mad Fat Road to Happiness, by Stephanie McAfee, is hilarious. It is not merely a “chick-lit” exploration of female issues—it resonates not only because of its superbly crafted world of women who create a sense of community for themselves, but also because it explores […]

Matt Simmons Interviews Drew Perry, Author of Kids These Days

MS:  Do you think this book had to take place in Florida? Is there a particular understanding of Florida in America, 2014, that makes it useful for what you’re doing here? Is Florida still a place of leisure and escape, like it was throughout the 20th century, or has it become something wild and untamed […]

March Read of the Month: “Kids These Days,” by Drew Perry

Reviewed by Matt Simmons Perhaps no trope is as evocative of southern writing as the “sense of place,” a concept that can be both incredibly limiting and powerfully productive in how we read about and respond to the American South. On the one hand, this trope may force us to read in search of southern […]