Archives for April 2012

Bill Lavender Interviews Moira Crone about her Book “The Not Yet”

BILL LAVENDER:  What does the book have and have not to do with New Orleans? MOIRA CRONE: When I first started writing the book in the 1990’s, I set it in New Orleans because I live here, and because it began with a dream that was set here—a strange dream of a young man sitting in […]

“Gone,” Edited with Photography by Nell Dickerson

Review by Allen Mendenhall   BelleBooks.  118 pages. I’ve always maintained a spectator’s curiosity in the rituals and practices of photography.  I can’t take a good picture, no matter which side of the camera I’m on, but I appreciate the idea of reducing the world to a more manageable form, something I can look at […]

Shelby Foote

Author profile by Meredith Edwards Shelby Dade Foote, Jr. was an American historian and novelist. His most famous work is The Civil War: A Narrative, a three-volume history of the war published over the course of two decades. His history was characterized by a literary style, and included Shakespearean metaphors and colloquialisms. He understood facts […]

“Ghosting” by Kirby Gann

Review by Tina Egnoski In Kirby Gann’s new book, Ghosting, Kentucky is raw-edged, poverty-stricken and violent.  It is also a place of physical beauty and, for some, of personal redemption. The protagonist James Cole Prather, known as Cole, is twenty-three and at loose ends.  He lives with his mother Lyda, an addict.  His half-brother Fleece […]

April Read of the Month: “The Not Yet,” by Moira Crone

Review by Philip K. Jason University of New Orleans Press. 272 pages. $15.95 Imagining a Mississippi Delta area significantly transformed by decades of ferocious hurricanes, Moira Crone takes us to a realm of islands where immortals rule and the rest live lives of aspiration or rebellion in a caste-bound, static society. Who wouldn’t want to […]

“Cathead Crazy” by Rhett DeVane

Review by Peggy Kassees Take a small Southern town. Add a mental institute for the criminally insane, one of the most beautiful rivers in Florida, and characters so vibrant they stay in the reader’s heart and mind like longtime friends and family. Then throw in Rhett DeVane’s exquisite sense of humor and finely tuned writing. […]

Rhett DeVane Interviews Lynne Bryant, Author of “Alligator Lake”

  RD:  You choose to show both the good and bad sides of life in the Deep South. How do you find this balance in your fiction? Do you feel as if your novels make any statements about the South? LB:  For every racist or bigoted person I’ve ever encountered, I’ve met an open-minded, loving […]

“Alligator Lake” by Lynne Bryant

Review by Rhett DeVane Lugging painful emotional baggage is difficult enough, but carting that baggage back to a small Mississippi town after ten years takes courage. When twenty-eight-year-old Avery Pritchett returns home to Greendale—“a place where racism reaches as deep and dark as the bottom of Alligator Lake”—for her brother’s wedding, she has more to […]